How to take care so your Facebook ads/apps are not rejected – Part 2

Recently I came across an amazing tool called S-Recorder wherein anything that’s happening on your screen can be recorded and saved as a video. This is just great. I will try and use it in my blog some other time if possible. Today we will look at how the 20% text rule will affect marketers and what are a few critical points on ad positioning.

What is this 20% text rule?

This is how Facebook defines it: “Ads on Facebook may not include images with text that covers more than 20% of the image’s area.”

The 20% text policy doesn’t include:

– Pictures of products that include text on the actual product (example: book covers, album covers, movie posters).

– Embedded text on images of games and apps.

– Cartoons where text is part of the cartoon.

The 20% text policy does include:

– Logos and slogans.

– Images with text overlay (example: watermarks).

– Images that are clearly edited to include text on the product as a loophole to policy.

Now you must be thinking how I will check whether the image has 20% text or not. Don’t worry, Facebook has made arrangements for that. Introducing Grid tool. When you open the link, you will see the below given page. Click on “Choose File”:

Grid tool image 1

I have selected an image which already has text in it. This is the actual product and this image might get approved. As you can see the image gets demarcated in 5 x 5 matrix resulting in 25 squares.

Grid tool image 2

If I select 5 boxes in the grid then we have reached the 20% limit.

Grid tool image 3

But if you are not able to limit the text in any of the 5 boxes then the creative is not approved. Easy right?

If you are wondering that I want to mention Facebook in my ads then are there any rules for that? Yes there are:

Do’s:

– Write “Facebook” with a capital “F”
– Display the word “Facebook” in the same font size and style as the content surrounding it

Don’t:

– Use the Facebook logo in place of the word “Facebook”
– Make Facebook plural, use it as a verb or abbreviate it
– Use an altered version of the Facebook logo in the image for your ad

Age-Restricted Material:

Some ads on Facebook aren’t approved because they might be trying to show photos or messages to an audience that’s too young. For example, ads for alcohol must meet certain guidelines which include restrictions on age based on the targeted location’s laws on alcohol ads.

Targeting:

You must not use targeting options to discriminate against, harass, provoke, or disparage users or to engage in predatory advertising practices.

Positioning:

– Relevancy: All components of an ad, including any text, images, or other media, must be relevant and appropriate to the product or service being offered and the audience viewing the ad.

– Accuracy: Ads must clearly represent the company, product, service, or brand that is being advertised.

– Landing pages: Products and services promoted in the ad copy must match those promoted on the landing page, and the destination site may not offer or link to any prohibited product or service.

A summary of few critical points to be kept in mind is as follows:

– Every part of an ad must be relevant to the product promoted.

– Do not position the ad in a sexually suggestive manner.

– Exploiting political agendas in the ad for commercial use is prohibited.

– The ad must include proper use of grammar.

– Usage of symbols, numbers or letters should be as per their actual meanings.

– Targeting for adult products must adhere to applicable laws.

That’s it for today. In the next part we will see how the ad content should be created and what type of businesses could be promoted or not promoted.

Till then keep doing awesome things 🙂

(Content and image courtesy https://developers.facebook.com/)

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